Posted on May 18, 2016 by Chris Harrington

Developing with Docker and Webpack

One of the big advantages of using containers in general is that you can keep your environments (whether that’s dev, test, staging, prod or even another developer’s machine) the same, which helps in tracking down those “prod only” bugs. Because of that, I won’t be using webpack-dev-server. I know, I know, but I’m really interested in making sure that my development environment matches the others as closely as possible, and webpack-dev-server is definitely not a production ready server. So, here’s the plan:

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Posted on May 11, 2015 by Chris Harrington

Testing a React project with Karma and Webpack

I’m a new fan of Webpack. It’s a great tool for intelligently bundling all of the packages your project needs and its watch feature is super quick. I’ve been playing around with it a bunch for my latest project which uses React (see here: Webpack with LESS and React) so I figure it was about time for me to start writing some unit tests to back up all that fancy code. I did a quick search for running Jasmine unit tests via Gulp that utilize Webpack’s bundling while also allowing for transformations of JSX files into raw JavaScript, but I didn’t have much luck there. I quickly settled on a Karma implementation, as there’s a plugin built especially for that purpose.

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Posted on May 7, 2015 by Chris Harrington

Webpack with LESS and React

I’ve recently been playing around with Webpack and I really like it. It has the benefits of Browserify in that you can specify an entry point that’ll pull in all of your required modules into a single bundle with optional minification, while also letting you bundle your style together in your modules. For example, I can require a style file for a particular module right from the module itself, which allows me to somewhat limit the global nature of CSS rules. On top of that, Webpack allows us to leverage LESS in these included style files, too, that get compiled down to CSS. I’m a huge fan of this, as it allows us to create less coupled modules in that each style file can be tied directly to a module, and only gets pulled in when its required. Webpack also utilizes what they call “loaders”, which are basically preprocessors that perform various tasks. For example, there’s a LESS loader to convert LESS into CSS, and a JSX loader to perform a similar conversion for React classes.

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